François Marie Aleno de Saint-Alouarn, Seigneur de Kersallic

François de Saint-Alouarn was born on the 24th of January, 1705 at the manor de Saint-Alouarn, Guengat, France to René Alleno de Saint-Alouarn (born 1678 and died 1755) and Claude L’Honoré (born 1682 and died 1754).

1720 

Saint-Alouarn entered the navy as a cadet in the Garde de la Marine.

1731

He was promoted to ensign de vaisseau (lieutenant).

1734 

January 27:
He married Marie Josèphe Pélagie de Kerret de Quillien at the Manor de Quillien, Pleyben. She was born in 1715.

1737

His daughter Marie Joséphe Catherine was born.

1738

July 28:
His son Louis François Marie was born at the manor of Saint-Alouarn,

1742

His daughter Marie René Pélagie was born.

1743

November 1:
He was ensign de vaisseau, aboard the corvette, la Noyade, at la Havre.

November 17: 
Saint-Alouarn was aboard the frigate l’Emeraude of 26 guns and recaptured the corsair, le Vainqueur, of Bordeaux, from the British. He was promoted to lieutenant de vaisseau (ship commander).

His daughter Marie Charlotte Pélagie was born.

1744

July:
François’ brother, René-Louis de Saint-Alouarn, the Chevalier de Rosmadec, joined him on patrols aboard l’Emeraude of 36 guns.

December:
He captured the Godolphin of 22 guns assisted by la Fine of 24 guns commanded by his brother, René-Louis de Saint-Alouarn. Saint-Alouarn received a personal letter of commendation from Minister Maurepas. It stated other captains at sea should emulate the two Saint-Alouarn brothers’ courage and skill.

1745

January 11:
He captured three British ships while in command of l’Emeraude.

January 20:
He captured the 120 ton merchant ship Marborough of Bristol. The ship refused to surrender and after a volley of musket fire killed its captain and owner, Richard Hiat, the merchant ship’s master surrendered.

January 22:
The Swallow of Cork, a 140 ton merchant ship under Capt. John Lang, was taken by l‘Emeraude.

January 28:
The Dispatch, of Liverpool, a 55 ton merchant ship, arriving from Antiqua carrying sugar, cotton, and rum, was captured while cruising near Le Havre, assisted by two other French ships.

February 6:
Together with la Fine under his brother’s command, they captured a British dispatch near Le Havre.

May 30: 
L’Emeraude and la Fine returned from a cruise of 114 days with
fourteen prizes of which ten were considered captures, the four others having been recaptured.  Of the ten, four were larger warships plus the corsair Prince of Wales of 10 guns. He was nominated for the Croix de Saint Louis for his bravery. Saint-Alouarn’s prize money amounted to 17,388 livres.

June 5:
Together with la Fine, they recaptured from the British the French warship Prince of Orange.

June 8:
La Fine and l’Emeraude recaptured Prince de Conti of Le Havre.

December 2: 
Saint-Alouarn, in the bay near Dunkirk, captured the Anne of London.

1746

His baby Marie Charlotte died.

1747

September 23:
In command of la Renommée, Saint-Alouarn was transporting Monsieur de Conflans, the new governor of Saint-Domingue (Santo Domingo), to the Antilles. The ship engaged with the British Amazon of 26 guns and la Renommée was severely damaged. It withdrew from the fight when the Amazon caught fire and more British warship arrived. During the night Saint-Alouarn changed course a number of times.

September 24: 
Within 50 miles of Ushant, Saint-Alouarn was chased and fought with the English warship Dover of 50 guns under Captain Shirley and surrendered after nearly sinking. Saint-Alouarn was made prisoner, held three months in Plymouth, and received a parole by an intervention of the Marshal de Saxe.

His daughter Anne Marie Pélagie was born.

1748

He was promoted to capitaine de vaisseau (captain).

1749

March 1:
His daughter Marie Charlotte was born.

Saint-Alouarn was made chevalier (knight) of the Ordre Militaire de Saint-Louis.

1753

He commanded the frigate l’Héroine of 26 guns and sailed to the French Polynesia isles in the Pacific.

1754

His son Louis François attended the Garde de Marine in Brest.

1755

Saint-Alouarn captained l’Aigle of 50 guns in the squadron under Admiral M. de Perrier and sailed to Saint-Dominique.

His son Louis François, at 17, joined the navy and was made an ensign aboard l’Espérance of 74 guns, commanded by René-Louis de Saint-Alouarn, his uncle.

November 15:
Saint-Alouarn’s son Louis Fran
çois, and brother, René-Louis de Saint-Alouarn commander of the l’Espérance, are captured by the British Orford of 70 guns after five hours of battle in the Gulf of Gascogne and are sent for two years as officer prisoners to Leicester.

1758

November:
His son Louis François sailed on le Défenseur of 74 guns commanded by de Bompar in Martinique.

1759

January 11:
Saint-Alouarn commanded le Juste of 70 guns in de Conflans’ squadron at Brest along with his brother René-Louis de Saint-Alouarn, his second in command.

November 21:
Near Belle-Isle, by rocks known as the Cardinaux, the squadron was attacked by Admiral Hawke’s fleet. Four enemy ships attacked le Juste and the Battle of Quiberon Bay lasted almost eight hours. Saint-Alouarn was wounded in the shoulder by a musket ball and taken below decks. His brother René took command and was wounded in the engagement and died that evening.

November 22:
Saint-Alouarn died in the early morning from his wounds of the previous day. Le Juste was
grounded and wrecked the next day at the mouth of the Loire River, at Chemoulin Point with a loss of 487 dead and 150 survivors.

Notes:

His wife Marie died in 1791 in Brest.

He had the following siblings, two brothers and two sisters:

  1. René Louis Alleno de Rosmadec, born Sept. 22, 1715 in Guengat. A naval captain also, he died with François aboard le Juste at the Battle of Quiberon Bay on November 21, 1759.
  2. Anne Claude Aleno de Saint-Alouarn, was born in Quimper and married Grégoire de Stongengant and remarried on May 8, 1758 to Charles du Boisguehenneuc in Quimper.
  3. Françoise Alleno, who married Charles de Raimond
  4. Joseph Olivier Alleno, who died in 1742

François had one son and five daughters:

  1. Marie Joséphe Catherine, born 1737 and died 1788
  2. Louis François Marie, born 1738, Seigneur de Saint-Alouarn. He was a naval captain and explorer. He died of a fever on October 27, 1772 in Port Louis, Île de France (Mauritius), at 34 years of age after discovering western Australia and laying claim to the continent for France.
  3. Marie Renée Pélagie, born 1742
  4. Marie Charlotte Pélagie, born 1743 and died 1746
  5. Anne Marie Pélagie, born 1747
  6. Marie Charlotte, born 1749 and died 1786